PATIENT STORY:
Breast Cancer

Initial Diagnosis

In 2014, Angela, a 46-year old woman, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 
her right lymph nodes. After a mastectomy and going through two cycles of 
chemotherapy, she was cleared.

In July of 2018, Angela went back to her doctor for a follow-up. A biopsy was 
completed and unfortunately confirmed that her cancer was back. The diagnosis
 was a locally recurrent triple negative breast cancer in regional lymph nodes.
 Having been cleared after her previous treatment, Angela was shocked that 
the cancer had returned.

Triple negative breast cancer does not respond to many standard therapies 
including hormonal therapy. Studies have shown that triple-negative breast
 cancer is more likely to spread beyond the breast and more likely to recur after treatment than other forms of breast cancer. The five-year survival rates tend to be lower for triple negative breast cancer patients. Knowing this Angela sought to maximize her chances, by seeking a second opinion through MORE Health.

MORE Health Co-Diagnosis Analysis

After collecting and uploading her medical records, MORE Health matched her with two excellent Physician Specialists, and Dr. Andrew Seidman, a medical oncologist with expertise in both early stage and advanced breast cancer and Dr. Bob Li, a medical oncologist specializing in lung cancer.

Dr. Seidman and Dr. Li requested further tests to be completed so that they could see the location of Angela’s tumor and evaluate if it has spread in order to develop a personalized treatment plan. Test results showed that the cancer had spread to her lungs. They recommended a more aggressive treatment plan of chemoradiotherapy to give her the best chance of survival.

The Outcome

Angela took MORE Health’s physician recommendations and began a 12-week treatment plan of aggressive chemoradiotherapy and is considering clinical trial options. Angela’s clinical response is continuing to be evaluated but she is showing progress in her treatment and has a positive outlook to be cured.

To protect patient privacy all patient stories use aliases.